events

My Europe – A Patrician Press Anthology: Book Launch

Thursday 8 March 2018, 6-8pm

University of Westminster

Tickets for My Europe are free but must be registered by clicking here.

My Europe

This diverse and varied anthology of poems, short stories and essays includes contributions by Suzy Adderley, Mark Brayley, Wersha Bhadradwa, Uwe Derksen, Petra McQueen, Giacinto Palmieri, George Szirtes and Stephen Timms MP, who will be participating in the event.

My Europe is one attempt to get the story straight, to explore the idea and the reality of Europe and our place in it, through a variety of sources – expert scrutiny, fiction, poetry, drama and personal testimony.

The book will be on sale for £10. This includes a copy of the book and a donation to two European charities.

Speakers include:

Suzy Adderley: a visual artist working in textiles and installation and also a writer. She studied Fine Art at Reading University and has a Textiles MA from Goldsmiths, University of London. She has written on Jackson Pollock and Alighiero Boetti. She recently exhibited The Parachute Files at the Constance Howard Gallery at Goldsmiths.

Wersha Bharadwa: an award-nominated journalist and writer. Wersha’s immersion and campaign journalism, essays and features have been published in The Guardian, The Independent, The Observer, Glamour and Marie Claire. She also lectures and runs workshops. She is the recipient of an Arts Council award for her first novel and for her debut full length stage play which​ is in development. She contributed a short story to Refugees and Peacekeepers, the first Patrician Press anthology, published in 2017.

Giacinto Palmieri: who studied Philosophy in his native Milan and later for an MA at Birkbeck. In parallel with a career in IT, he then started to perform as a stand-up comedian, deriving humour from language and cultural differences. He has recently received a PhD from the University of Surrey with a thesis on bilingual comedy.

George Szirtes: born in Hungary in 1948. His first book of poems, The Slant Door (1979) won the Faber Prize. He has published many since then, Reel (2004) winning the T S Eliot Prize,for which he has been twice shortlisted since. His latest book is Mapping the Delta (Bloodaxe 2016).

For more information about My Europe please visit:

http://patricianpress.com/book/my-europe-a-patrician-press-anthology/

Patrician Press:

The philosophy and aim of the non-profit Patrician Press is to encourage and promote writers of high-quality fiction and poetry. We are small, independent and courageous. We strongly believe that it is imperative to uphold and maintain the quality of contemporary literature in today’s challenging, competitive and ever-changing technological world.

CLICK HERE FOR FREE TICKETS TO MY EUROPE – A PATRICIAN PRESS ANTHOLOGY: BOOK LAUNCH

Diane Williams Reading and In Conversation with Toby Litt

Monday 11 December 2017

University of Westminster

Diane Williams has been publishing her wholly distinctive short fiction in the US for the past quarter of a century.  She is the author of eight books, including a collection of her selected stories, and is the founder and editor of the literary annual NOON.  Her most recent book, Fine, Fine, Fine, Fine, Fine was published in the UK by CB editions in 2016.

Toby Litt is the author of five books of short stories and ten novels. His new novel, Notes for a Young Gentleman, will be published by Seagull Press in December. Toby’s most recent book is Mutants: Selected Essays, also published by Seagull. Toby teaches creative writing at Birkbeck College. He blogs about writing at www.tobylitt.com.

CLICK HERE FOR A REVIEW OF DIANE WILLIAMS READING AND IN CONVERSATION WITH TOBY LITT

Women, Writing and Freedom

Thursday 19 October 2017

University of Westminster

Keynote talk by Maureen Freely, President of English PEN.

‘A word after a word after a word is power.’ Margaret Atwood

In a masculine centred literary tradition that values male over female voices, women refuse to be silenced and continue to tell the truth about their personal and political lives. Join us in exploring the politics of silence and in honouring the voices of women writers everywhere who, despite repression and invisibility, risk all to give voice to the need for liberation and freedom.

Speakers:

Keynote speaker Maureen Freely on the crucial work done by English PEN and like-minded partners, with particular reference to women writers.

Hema Macherla on the plight of Indian women – fallen women, broken women and women shunned by society.

Avril Joy on working for over twenty-five years with women writers in HMP Low Newton.

Lynn Michell on publishing women writers. She is here to celebrate ten years of Linen Press and to launch The Red Beach Hut.

CLICK HERE FOR A REVIEW OF WOMEN, WRITING AND FREEDOM

Republic of Consciousness Prize Inaugural Award Ceremony

9 March 2017

University of Westminster

CLICK HERE FOR A REVIEW OF THE REPUBLIC OF CONSCIOUSNESS PRIZE INAUGURAL AWARD CEREMONY

DIY: Start Your Own Journal, Press, or University

Led by Professor Craig Saper, University of Maryland Baltimore County

Thursday 26 January 2017, 4-6pm

University of Westminster

Looking at a series of experiments in publishing scholarship, this workshop asks participants to propose venues and modes of presentation appropriate to the scholarly questions they seek to ask.

Based on Craig Saper’s research on Intimate Bureaucracies and on his co-founding Electric Press and Textshop Experiments, founding Roving Eye Press, and starting experimental venues for emerging forms of knowledge, like the online reading machine that simulates a modernist project from 1929, as well as participating in others’ experiments in publishing including Punctum Books and the media-making journal HyperRhiz, this workshop asks participants to propose venues and modes of presentation appropriate to the scholarly questions they seek to ask. Based on Craig Saper’s research on Intimate Bureaucracies and on his co-founding Electric Press and Textshop Experiments, founding Roving Eye Press, and building an online reading machine, the workshop asks us to consider publishing as scholarship not merely a conduit for research.

Reading and Being Read: Birmingham

Emma Wright, Editor of The Emma Press 

Alan Mahar, former Editor at Tindal Street Press

IKON GALLERY

Birmingham

Tuesday 27 June 2017, 6-9pm

Twitter hashtag: #ReadingBeingRead

The last few years has seen an explosion of new small presses and independent publishers around the country, publishing new and exciting fiction and poetry. If you are a keen reader and want to know more about the difference being a small press makes to how they work and what they publish, come along to hear from local independent press The Emma Press, and former small-press editor Alan Mahar.

Join us for this informal discussion on challenges related to small press publishing. A roundtable conversation with Alan Mahar, former editor of Tindal Street Press, and Emma Wright, editor of The Emma Press will be followed by readings from authors Alan Beard, Gaynor Arnold and others published by The Emma Press and the former Tindal Street Press.

Supported using public funding by Arts Council England

CLICK HERE FOR A REVIEW OF READING AND BEING READ: BIRMINGHAM

Reading and Being Read: Newcastle

with Ellen Phethean, Valerie LawsRed Squirrel Press, Myrmidon Books

NEWCASTLE CITY LIBRARY

Newcastle upon Tyne

11am to 4pm, Saturday 18 February 2017

Twitter hashtag: #ReadingBeingRead

Supported using public funding by Arts Council England

CLICK HERE FOR A REVIEW OF READING AND BEING READ: NEWCASTLE

Reading and Being Read: Manchester

with Comma Press, If P Then Q, Michelle Green, Holly Pester & ZimZalla

MANCHESTER CENTRAL LIBRARY

11am to 4pm, 12 November 2016

Twitter hashtag: #ReadingBeingRead

The last few years has seen an explosion of new small presses and independent publishers around the country, publishing new and exciting fiction and poetry. If you are a keen reader and want to know more about the difference being a small press makes to how they work and what they publish, come along to hear from local small presses, Comma Press and If P then Q. The day will feature readings from two writers, Michelle Green from Comma Press and Holly Pester from If P then Q.

Small presses are often able to give much more attention to the physical characteristics of the book. Tom Jenks from zimZalla and James Davies from If P Then Q will be discussing and presenting poetry books as objects to give a creative insight into one of the distinctive characteristics of a small press.

Supported using public funding by Arts Council England

CLICK HERE FOR A REVIEW OF READING AND BEING READ: MANCHESTER

Literary Criticism and the Small Press: A symposium

Friday 1 July 2016, 10am-6pm

The Boardroom, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London, WIB 2UW

symposium image

Literary criticism has historically been practised using three broad models: a close attention to form; a consideration of the way that histories of ideas, identities and social forms are apparent in literary work; a more sociologically oriented consideration of practices of production and reading. From the twentieth century on, while the relations among these, and the prioritising or marginalising of each, shifted and changed, the mutual shaping of literary writing and its means of production has been consistently ignored. In contemporary literary criticism, while much literary critical work combines the first and the second, very little considers all three. Detailed consideration of the way that formal elements are shaped by and interact with the production and dissemination of writing remains almost absent from the discipline. At the same time, the limits of mainstream publishing and the growth of the small press have each been particularly visible since the economic crash of 2008, yet an investigation of the relation between this and the kinds of writing studied and interpreted has not emerged.

Literary Criticism and the Small Press: A Symposium aims to draw attention to and investigate this absence through three broad themes. The location of the small press as the site of formal innovation is clear from the end of the nineteenth century, and its role in the dissemination of modernism is well known. How has this relation changed over the last century or so, and what are the interventions or absences in the literary critical work with regard to it? From William Morris to the digital revolution, the relation of the small press to writing has made central the question of materiality. What is the relation between material and linguistic forms? The relation of the small press to the mainstream, the material forms of writing and linguistic innovation are all mediated and determined by the institutions within which they exist — publishing, bookselling, the university, government funding of the arts and universities, and so on. How do these institutions shape what is published, where and for whom?

The symposium will consist of three panels:

Materialities: Nicholas Thoburn; Sophie Seita

Institutions: Claire Squires; Lisa Otty; Nick Thurston; Matvei Yankelevich

Histories: John Wrighton; Matthew Sperling; Stephen Voyce; Richard Price

The Symposium has been organized by Dr Georgina Colby, Dr Kaja Marczewska and Dr Leigh Wilson as part of the Contemporary Small Press Project, supported by the Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture, University of Westminster.

Reading and Being Read: Readers, Writers, Publishers 

A symposium and workshop for hungry minds and creative readers, bringing together writers, readers and publishers from independent presses in the UK

Saturday 20th February 2016, 11am-4pm at The British Library.

Susie Nott-Bower and Lynn Michell, Linen Press and Alex Pheby and Sam Jordison, Galley Beggar talk about the experience of writing and publishing new work. In the afternoon, we’ll be joined by Tony White, Piece of Paper Press, and students from the London College of Communication  to collaboratively create our own independent publication. Susie Nott-Bower has worked in theatre and television production, before writing her first novel,The Making of Her (Linen Press, 2012). Susie is currently working on her second novel, Reborn, and regularly writes on the Strictly Writing blog. Alex Pheby is the author of two books, Grace (Two Ravens Press, 2009) and Playthings (Galley Beggar, 2015). Alex is a graduate of Goldsmith’s Creative Writing MA and teaches at the University of Greenwich.  Linen Press was founded by Lynn Michel to publish diverse, challenging and surprising books written by women, and with women readers particularly in mind. The press publishes work from new and emerging authors, as well as more established writers. Galley Beggar Press was established in 2012 specifically to support writers of ambition and literary merit, who nevertheless have struggled to either find or retain a publisher. Tony White is an author, whose works include Shakleton’s Man Goes South (Science Museum, 2013), and Foxy-T(Faber & Faber, 2003). He has been writer in residence for the Science Museum and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, UCL. In 1994, he set up Piece of Paper Press as a low-tech imprint to publish new writings and visual or graphic works and distribute them for free.

In association with The Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture, University of Westminster

Supported using public funding by Arts Council England

CLICK HERE FOR A REVIEW OF READING AND BEING READ: READERS, WRITERS, PUBLISHERS

The Contemporary Small Press: A Symposium

The Boardroom, 309 Regent Street, University of Westminster

10:00-17:00

The Contemporary Small Press Book Fair

The Fyvie Hall, 309 Regent Street, University of Westminster

17:00-21:00

Friday 20th February 2015

The last decade has witnessed a turn to considering the legacies of modernism prevalent and operative within contemporary literature and culture. Within the scholarly discourses surrounding this shift, there has been little discussion of the status of the small press in the twenty-first century, and its vital role in the dissemination of avant-garde writing. This symposium seeks to address the role and status of the small press in the UK as a field of academic enquiry. We hope to offer a forum that will bring together a number of small presses, and facilitate productive dialogue between the diverse publishers working with contemporary innovative writers and poets.

The day symposium will consist of three panels of scholars, publishers, writers, and poets, which will explore the history of the small press, literary politics and the relationship between the small press and the mainstream, and materialities of the text and small press publishing. The Contemporary Small Press Book Fair following the symposium will showcase and market the rich and varied work currently being published by small presses.

Poets and writers reading from their work throughout the day, and into the evening, include Carol Watts, Peter Hughes, Toby Litt, Robert Hampson, Jennifer Cooke, Nicholas Royle, Amy Cutler, Rod Mengham, Tony White, and Michael Nath.

Participating presses include Oystercatcher Press, Reality Street, Route, Veer Books, Comma Press, and Equipage.

A collection of new writing by writers and poets taking part in the symposium, outLINES: from the Small Press, published in collaboration with Oystercatcher Press, will be available on the day.

 

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